Alcoholics Anonymous co-founder rejects Christ

According to A.A. co-founder Bill Wilson, “Christ is, of course, the leading figure to me. Yet I have never been able to receive complete assurance that He was one hundred per cent God. I seem to be just as comfortable with the figure of ninety-nine per cent. I know that from a conservative Christian point of view this is a terrific heresy.” [1]

Jesus said to them, “Truly, truly, I say to you, before Abraham was born, I am.” (John 8:58)

Keep Bill Wilson’s admission in mind when people try and cast Wilson as a Christian, and A.A. as Christian in origin.

Source Notes:
1. Mel B., My Search For Bill W., pg. 21 ( from a letter dated July 2, 1956 from A.A. co-founder Bill Wilson to Mel B.)

George Muller quote

We should not shrink from opportunities where our faith may be tried. The more I am in a position to be tried in faith, the more I will have the opportunity of seeing God’s help and deliverance. Every fresh instance in which He helps and delivers me will increase my faith. The believer should not shrink from situations, positions, or circumstances in which his faith maybe tried, but he should cheerfully embrace them as opportunities to see the hand of God stretched out in help and deliverance. Thus his faith will be strengthened.
— George Müller (27 September 1805 – 10 March 1898, Christian evangelist and director of the Ashley Down orphanage in Bristol, England. In his ministry he cared for 10,024 orphans, providing educational opportunities for the orphans, and established 117 schools which offered Christian education to more than 120,000.

What happens to Christians in Alcoholics Anonymous?

Christians in the A.A. program often adjust their theology. In a pastor’s office, an A.A. Christian told me straight faced that alcoholics were too angry and didn’t want to hear about Christ, so the “higher power” concept was necessary. This is simply one more repetition of what I have heard at many, many A.A. meetings.

A.A. has given us the confusion of recovery passing for sanctification, and twelve-step theology has some Christians in A.A. believing it is perfectly fine to encourage alcoholics to go ahead and make up a “god.” To help justify attendance in this non-biblical spirituality, the myth has been promulgated that most alcoholics with custom-designed higher powers will eventually come to Christ. This is simply not so. It is relatively rare but is presented as a common occurrence. This claim is one of the primary ways Christians justify A.A.

In Alcoholics Anonymous, most Christians experience a transference of faith. The twelve-step experience often becomes an idol. It is not uncommon to speak with Christians who are more concerned with “recovery” than sanctification and who demonstrate a preference for A.A. rather than the fellowship with the saints. Click here to continue reading…